WHEN: First Friday night of each month (except Jan)

WHEN: 7.20pm for 8pm

WHERE: The Gerringong Town Hall, Fern Street, Gerringong.

Cost: $10 per person or buy a personal subscription - 11 films for $60! 10-film multi-tickets also available for $75 - to share or use for yourself!

Any questions? Email us at picsandflicks@gmail.com

Monday, December 19, 2016

Your film experience with Pics and Flicks in 2016

We want to know which movies you enjoyed during 2016, which you didn't like as much, and what you would be interested in seeing. 

Help us provide a better movie-going experience for you by completing this survey. Just 5 minutes of your time and it is anonymous.

Survey closes Tuesday 31 January 2017 - results advised at our first Gerringong Pics & Flicks screening on Friday 3 February 2017.
Click or tap on this link and rank each film that you saw.  There is also space to add extra comments too, which we would really appreciate.
Thanks for your time and support of Gerringong Pics and Flicks.

Pics and Flicks films in 2016 - survey

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

MUSTANG 4TH NOV 2016


Mustang
delivers a bracing -- and thoroughly timely -- message whose power is further bolstered by the efforts of a stellar ensemble cast.





It is early summer in a village in Northern Turkey. Five free-spirited teenaged sisters splash about on the beach with their male classmates. Though their games are merely innocent fun, a neighbor passes by and reports what she considers to be illicit behavior to the girls' family. The family overreacts, removing all "instruments of corruption," like cell phones and computers, and essentially imprisoning the girls, subjecting them to endless lessons in housework in preparation for them to become brides. As the eldest sisters are married off, the younger ones bond together to avoid the same fate. The fierce love between them empowers them to rebel and chase a future where they can determine their own lives in Deniz Gamze Ergüven's debut, a powerful portrait of female empowerment.
Rating: PG-13 (for mature thematic material, sexual content and a rude gesture)
Genre:Drama
Directed By:Deniz Gamze Ergüven
Written By:Deniz Gamze Ergüven , Alice Winocour

Friday, September 30, 2016

RAMS 7th October 2016

Rams
Who would have thought that a tale about sheep in rural Iceland could bring tears to your eyes? Grímur Hakonarson’s RAMS does just that. Majestically shot in a spectacular, weather-swept valley, this wryly observed fable about two brothers who are more obstinate than the sheep they breed begins as a droll comedy about rural life and grows into a graceful and mythic tale about family, community and legacy.
Siblings Gummi (Sigurður Sigurjónsson) and Kiddi (Theodór Júlíusson) have been living side by side without speaking to each other for forty years, each tending to their pedigree ancestral flock. When communication can’t be avoided, Kiddi’s dog Somi trots between houses carrying their handwritten notes between his teeth. Kiddi is a boozer and brawler, a popular figure at community get-togethers, but it’s through the eyes of his gentle younger brother Gummi that we see him acting out.
Their world is upended when the valley comes under threat from infection. While neighbours abandon their land, each brother tries to stave off disaster: Kiddi by taking action, and Gummi by using his wits. As the authorities close in, there’s every reason for them to set aside a lifetime of hostility to save their special breed, and their unique way of life, from extinction. But can they?
The hugely-popular winner of the Un Certain Regard Best Film Prize at the 2015 Cannes International Film Festival (awarded by a Jury led by Isabella Rossellini), and greeted with a thunderous 10 minute standing ovation at its premiere, Hákonarson effortlessly balances humour and pathos to tell a tale that feels both intimate and epic, a loving portrait of both culture and family in a place where change doesn’t come easily.
“Tender and elegiac – a film with heart in every frame. It’s a story of great humanity, of brotherhood and of altruism. It’s no fluke and a credit to Hákonarson that when the lights came up in the theatre I was already sending a text 4,000 miles away to my brother to let him know that I love him and miss him something awful.”
Shane Scott-Travis, TASTE OF CINEMA

Director: Grímur Hákonarson
Cast: Sigurður Sigurjónsson, Theodór Júlíusson, Charlotte Bøving
Duration: 92 mins
Country of Origin: Iceland


Sunday, August 7, 2016

45 YEARS 2nd September 2016

 




In the beautifully acted drama “45 Years,” a marriage lives and dies; we watch its agonized struggle, like a butterfly impaled on a pin. It’s a quiet movie, taking place over a week in the lives of Kate and Geoff Mercer (Charlotte Rampling, Tom Courtenay), a retired British couple happily anticipating a party for their 45th anniversary. In the opening scenes, Geoff receives unexpected news: The body of his long-ago girlfriend, who died in a mountain accident years before he met Kate, has been recovered. “They’ve found Katya,” he tells Kate with a quavery desperation in his voice. “My Katya.”
It’s a tiny bit of news, a pinprick, but it lets the air out of their marriage. Kate tries to make a little joke — Katya, she says, must still look like she did in 1962 — but Rampling lets the laugh die on her face. From there, the Mercers go about their lives as the week plays out, but something’s off, something’s festering. Unable to stop herself, Kate begins digging through boxes in the attic, trying to understand what this woman meant to her husband for so many years. Ultimately, she confronts Geoff about the ghost in their marriage: “She’s been standing in the corner of this room, all along, behind my back.”

Writer/director Andrew Haigh (“Weekend”) knows that he has gold with the pairing of Rampling (who’s been nominated for an Oscar for her work in this film) and Courtenay, and his camera calmly watches as they tear our hearts in two. Courtenay’s Geoff has a fragility, a gentle vagueness; he doesn’t always seem to see Kate, and doesn’t know what she needs to hear. Rampling’s character, by contrast, is a slow-burn simmer.

Actors: Charlotte Rampling, Tom Courtenay, Geraldine James.
Written and directed by Andrew Haigh.
Length: 95 minutes.
Rated R for language and brief sexuality.

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

LOOKING FOR GRACE 8th July 2016

Looking For Grace


Please note change of screening date due to Federal election


The acclaimed new film from Sue Brooks,the multi award-winning director of Japanese Story and Road To Nhill, LOOKING FOR GRACE is an intimate, funny and profoundly moving story about chance, fate and the complexities of family life.
When rebellious 16-year-old Grace (rising star Odessa Young) takes off, her exasperated mum and dad (the superb Radha Mitchell and Richard Roxburgh) enlist the help of a close-to-retirement detective, and begin the long drive from Perth out to the West Australian wheatbelt to try to find her. On the journey, the two must confront the realities of their changing relationship to one another, and to their daughter…
Wry, intriguing and poignant, Brooks’ unflinching reflection on the disruptive effects of both adolescence and middle-age boasts her trademark sense of character, acerbic humour and eye for the hypnotic rhythms of Australia’s regional landscapes. Innovatively structured to incrementally reveal each character’s journey – and secrets – from numerous vantage points, LOOKING FOR GRACE is ultimately a beautiful, bold and unmistakably Australian story that reminds us that life is precious, and can change in the blink of an eye.
Palace Films


Director: Sue Brooks
Cast: Richard Roxburgh, Radha Mitchell, Odessa Young, Terry Norris, Julia Blake, Tasma Walton, Kenya Pearson, Harry Richardson
Duration: 100 mins
Country of Origin: Australia

MMature themes and coarse language 

Monday, May 16, 2016

THE BELIER FAMILY 3rd June 2016

The Belier Family.
The Belier Family

WINNER – 2015 LUMIERE AWARDS –
   Best Actress (Viard),
   Best Female Newcomer (Emera)
WINNER – 2015 CÉSAR AWARDS –

   Best Female Newcomer (Emera)
NOMINEE – 2015 CÉSAR AWARDS –

   Best Film,
   Best Actress (Viard),
   Best Actor (Damiens),
   Best Supporting Actor (Elmosnino),
   Best Female Newcomer (Emera), Best Original Screenplay
NOMINEE – 2015 EUROPEAN FILM AWARDS

   Best European Comedy A captivating new star is born in THE BÉLIER FAMILY, Eric Lartigau’s fabulous, heart-felt comedy hit about a young girl whose close bond to her hearing-impaired family is challenged by the discovery of an extraordinary talent for music.
In the Bélier family, everyone is deaf, except dutiful sixteen-year-old Paula (beautiful newcomer Louane Emera). She acts as an indispensable interpreter for her parents and younger brother, especially in the running of the family dairy farm.
Though her salt-of-the-earth father (François Damiens) has decided to run for mayor – spurred on by her vivacious but over-involved mother (indelibly portrayed by Karin Viard) – Paula’s attentions are very much elsewhere. She’s witnessed the handsome new boy at school sign up for the choir, and impulsively joined too. It’s not long before her music teacher (Éric Elmosnino) discovers her considerable talent, however his encouragement only exacerbates the matter of Paula’s independence…
Building to a heart-soaring and emotional finale, THE BÉLIER FAMILY is a feel-great triumph. Emera, making her screen debut after being discovered on the French edition of The Voice, is a genuine revelation – she lends both sincerity and joy to this deeply moving film that has been a word-of-mouth phenomenon across Europe, achieving over 10 million admissions to date and becoming France’s most popular film of 2015.
from:  http://www.palacefilms.com.au/thebelierfamily/
Film Review
★★★★
“Uplifting. Avoids the cloying sweetness of Hollywood by striking a gently subversive note… There's no limits to the Bélier’s aspirations or inhibitions… it’s an inventive form of mayhem. With a big finish, the film sends us out on a high.”
Sandra Hall, THE SUN-HERALD/SUNDAY AGE

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

PHOENIX 6th May 2016



Pics and Flicks
brings you:

PHOENIX
 
 
  •  Nelly (Nina Hoss), a German-Jewish nightclub singer, has survived a concentration camp, but with her face disfigured by a bullet wound. After reconstructive surgery, Nelly emerges with a new face, one similar but different enough that her former husband, Johnny (Ronald Zehrfeld), doesn’t recognize her. Rather than reveal herself, Nelly walks into a dangerous game of duplicity and disguise as she tries to figure out if the man she loves may have betrayed her to the Nazis. [IFC Films]
  • Runtime: 98 min
    Rating: Rated PG-13 for some thematic elements and brief suggestive material
    Production: ARTE
    Genres: Drama, History
    Countries: Germany, Poland
    Languages: English, German
    Director:
    Christian Petzold
    Writers:
    Christian Petzold
    Harun Farocki
    Hubert Monteilhet
     
  • Starring: Felix Römer, Imogen Kogge, Michael Maertens, Nina Hoss, Nina Kunzendorf, Ronald Zehrfeld, Trystan Pütter, Uwe Preuss

Monday, March 21, 2016

FAR FROM MEN 1st April 2016



Far From Men
Algeria, 1954. Former French Army soldier Daru (Viggo Mortensen) is attempting to lead a quiet life as a schoolteacher in a small mountainous town at the onset of the Algerian War of Independence. When he is given the task of transporting an Algerian dissident (Reda Kateb) to a nearby city to stand trial, Daru finds his peaceful existence disrupted by the ensuing chaos that surrounds his village.

Grounded by Mortensen’s fiercely understated French-language performance, a score by neo-Western masters Nick Cave and Warren Ellis, and the beautifully stark backdrop of Algeria’s mountain ranges, director David Oelhoffen transplants a classic western tale into an unstable warzone to tell the story of one man’s sense of personal duty in light of the realities of the world around him.

Genna Terranova   Tribeca Film Festival film guide.
Film Information
Year: 2015
Length: 102 minutes
Language: French

Cast & Credits
Director and Screenwriter: David Oelhoffen
Producer: Marc Du Pontavice, Matthew Gledhill
Editor: Juliette Welfling
Cinematographer: Guillaume Deffontaines
Composer: Nick Cave, Warren Ellis

Cast: Viggo Mortensen, Reda Kateb
Includes mature themes and some violence.

Saturday, February 20, 2016

HE NAMED ME MALALA 4th March 2016



Pics and Flicks presents

He Named Me Malala



"One child, one teacher, one book and one pen can change the world."

– Malala

HE NAMED ME MALALA is an intimate portrait of Malala Yousafzai, who was wounded when Taliban gunmen opened fire on her and her friends' school bus in Pakistan's Swat Valley. The then 15-year-old teenager, who had been targeted for speaking out on behalf of girls' education in her region of Swat Valley in Pakistan, was shot in the head, sparking international media outrage. An educational activist in Pakistan, Yousafzai has since emerged as a leading campaigner for the rights of children worldwide and in December 2014, became the youngest-ever Nobel Peace Prize Laureate. (C) Fox Searchlight
Rating:PG-13 (for thematic elements involving disturbing images and threats)
Genre:Documentary
Directed Davis Guggenheim
Runtime:1 hr. 27 min.




Wednesday, February 3, 2016

TANNA 5th January 2016

Tanna (2015) Poster

Gerringong Pics and Flicks

is starting it's 2016 season of great films with Tanna.


Review by Richard Kuipers - Variety

Courtesy of Venice Film Festival

The eternal story of young lovers breaking all the rules and risking everything to be together is beautifully told in “Tanna,” the first-ever feature shot entirely in the South Pacific nation of Vanuatu. Based on dramatic events that took place on the volcanic island of Tanna in 1987, the pic weaves fascinating details of tribal life into a universally accessible and emotionally affecting romantic drama. Very well performed by non-professionals drawn from communities whose history is represented on screen, “Tanna” marks a notable narrative debut for the experienced Aussie documaking duo of Bentley Dean and Martin Butler.

Elegantly edited by Tania Michel Nehme (“Ten Canoes” and most other Rolf de Heer films) and performed with conviction by actors who’d never seen a film or a movie camera before, the pic is a stirring tribute to the power of love and will likely prompt many viewers to shed tears of sadness and tears of joy at various points.